United States

The Coastal Resilience approach, tools and applications provide support for decision-makers working to identify solutions for risk reduction and adaptation. Core federal U.S. partners include the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and U.S. Geologic Survey as well as emerging opportunities with the Federal Emergency Management Agency and Council on Environmental Quality, who is leading the effort to carry out President Obama Administration’s Climate Action Plan.

California

California

California’s iconic coastline is threatened by the coastal squeeze between upland development and climate change induced sea level rise. The Nature Conservancy and partners are demonstrating the effectiveness of coastal resilience adaptation planning statewide through their engagements in Monterey Bay, and Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties.

Connecticut

Connecticut

The current and future resilience of Connecticut’s coastline and waterways depends on our ability to visualize change, plan wisely for the future, and take action today to avoid future costs to the economy, citizens and environment.

Georgia

Georgia

In Georgia, local, state, federal government agencies, non-profit organizations, and private citizens are assessing where people and infrastructure within coastal communities are vulnerable to coastal hazards and sea level rise and applying natural solutions such as land protection, shoreline and wetland restoration and flood risk decision support tools.

Gulf of Mexico

Gulf of Mexico

The Gulf has seen about half of its coastal habitats vanish during the past century. The region must re-establish the strong, resilient natural communities that for centuries have protected people and wildlife from storms and provided a wealth of fishery production and biodiversity.

Hawaii

Hawaii

The island of Hawaiʻi is home to a network of unique groundwater-fed anchialine pools, wetlands, and fishponds, which support numerous endemic species as well as provide key ecosystem services to natural and human communities. Predicting the effect of sea-level rise on these ecosystems requires models that incorporate groundwater levels which are elevated above sea levels and will exacerbate flooding in the porous basalt aquifer.

New Jersey

New Jersey

The 127 miles of New Jersey coastline along the Atlantic Ocean, Delaware Bay, New York/New Jersey Harbor, and Raritan Bay, are critical places to ensure that the health of habitats is incorporated into community resilience planning.

New York

New York

New York’s low-lying coastal environment makes the region particularly vulnerable to the impacts of sea level rise. This will only be exacerbated in the face of what are expected to be more frequent and more powerful coastal storms, as recent experiences with Superstorm Sandy and Tropical Storm Irene have shown.

North Carolina

North Carolina

The Albemarle-Pamlico Sound region is home to more than 2.7 million people. Millions more visit the area because of its wide array of natural resources. Much of the area is low-lying, leaving coastal communities threatened by severe storms, coastal flooding, and rapid shoreline change.

South Carolina

South Carolina

South Carolina coastal communities are facing more frequent flooding from sea level rise and storm events. In response, they are identifying ways to visualize and reduce risk to their communities using natural infrastructure like coastal wetlands, beaches and dunes, living shorelines, and river floodplains.

Southeast Florida and the Florida Keys

Southeast Florida and the Florida Keys

From North Carolina down to Florida coastal communities have partnered to build understanding of the roles that natural ecosystems have in regards to coastal resilience and planning.

Southeast U.S.

Southeast U.S.

California’s iconic coastline is threatened by the coastal squeeze between upland development and climate change induced sea level rise. The Nature Conservancy and partners are demonstrating the effectiveness of coastal resilience adaptation planning statewide through their engagements in Monterey Bay, and Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties.

Virginia Eastern Shore

Virginia Eastern Shore

Virginia’s Eastern Shore lies within one of the U.S’s most vulnerable coastal regions. Sea levels are rising at three to four times the global average and storms are intensifying. Here, leading coastal scientists and community partners are using this living laboratory to better understand how nature can make coastal communities here—and everywhere—more resilient in the face of a changing climate.

Washington

Washington

Puget Sound is a national treasure, the second largest estuary in the country, a factory for salmon and shellfish, home to 4.5 million people, and the economic engine of one of the nation’s strongest regional economies. These are increasingly vulnerable to rising sea levels, more extreme coastal storms, and more frequent river flooding.

Western Lake Erie

Western Lake Erie

Western Lake Erie (WLE) is the most biologically productive area in all of the Great Lakes, supports commercially valuable fisheries, provides drinking water for 11 million people, and supplies an abundance of recreational benefits. However, WLE is at risk from impacts brought on by a changing climate. TNC and partners in the area are working together to model and forecast not only areas that are most valuable to restore and preserve, but also areas that will be the most vulnerable to flooding with increasingly erratic lake levels.